Colossal Ancient Egyptian Statue Moved to New Museum

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The Ancient Egyptian statue of Ramses II was moved to the Grand Egyptian Museum 

A colossal 3200-year-old Ancient Egyptian statue was recently moved to its new home at the Grand Egyptian Museum ahead of its opening this November. The 36-foot-tall statue of Pharaoh Ramses II weighs over 80 tonnes. It will be the very first artifact placed in the new museum that will also hold over 100,000 other relics.

Rameses II was one of the greatest pharaohs of Ancient Egypt. He is believed to have ruled Egypt for 66 years from 1279 to 1213 BC as the third pharaoh of the Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt. He is also famous for having built on a colossal scale. The Ramesseum tomb complex in Thebes and the Great Temple at Abu Simbel were both constructed during his reign. Here, 65-foot depictions of a seated Ramses flank the entrance to a stunning temple complex carved into the mountainside.

Ramses II also built the Great Temple at Abu Simbel
Massive Ancient Egyptian Statue of Ramses II Moves to Grand Egyptian Museum 

The statue that now sits in the museum was found at Mit Rahina (ancient Memphis), an archaeological site in the early 1800s by Italian adventurer Giovanni Caviglia. It was also Caviglia who originally excavated the Sphinx.  It has since been moved numerous times around the country. Its last resting place was at a temporary site in Giza, where it has sat since the 1950s.

Before Giza, the statue stood at the center of Bab Al-Hadid square in front of Cairo’s main train station

The massive granite Ancient Egyptian statue was moved to what is hoped to be its permanent destination in a custom-made metal cage resting on two trailer beds.

The Grand Egyptian Museum is set to be the largest archaeological museum in the world.  It is built over 120 acres and is located just 2 kilometers from the Giza pyramid complex. Apart from the massive statue of Ramses II which will sit in the Grand Atrium, the Grand Staircase and the Tutankhamun Hall will open later this year.

More information about the Grand Egyptian Museum is available at their official website.

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